Word of the Day: Denwa (でんわ – 電話)

Word of the Day: Denwa (でんわ – 電話) Meaning: Telephone. Use ‘suru/shimasu’ to make into the verb “to call on the phone.”

Example 1: あなたの でんわばんごうを おしえて ください。 / あなたの 電話番号を 教えて 下さい。 / Anata no denwa bangou wo oshiete kudasai. = Please tell me (“teach me”) your telephone number.

Example 2: わたしは でんわが にがてです。 / 私は 電話が 苦手です。 / Watashi wa denwa ga nigate desu. = I’m not good at phones. (E.g., I have a hard time speaking on the phone.)

Example 3: でんわしても いいですか? / 電話しても いいですか? / Denwa shite mo ii desu ka? = May I telephone (you)?

Example 4: ごご くじに でんわ して ください。 / 午後 九時に 電話して 下さい。 / Gogo kuji ni denwa shite kudasai. = Please call me at 9PM.

* Please click the play button in the bamboo logo to listen to the recording.
https://soundcloud.com/human-japanese/word-of-the-day-denwa

Advertisements

Su (す – 巣)

(す – 巣) Meaning: Nest (for birds, bees, and even animals such as foxes, which might require a specialized word like “den” in English).

Example 1: あれは とりの す です。/ あれは 鳥の 巣 です。/ Are wa tori no su desu. = That’s a bird nest.

Example 2: はちの す に ちかよらないように!/ 蜂の 巣に 近寄らないように!/ Hachi no su ni chikayoranai you ni! = Be careful not to get too close to the bees’  nest!

Photo: Rika Nakajima

Dousatsuryoku

Dousatsuryoku (どうさつりょく – 洞察力) Meaning: Insight, powers of insight.

Example 1: かのじょの どうさつりょくは するどい。/ 彼女の 洞察力は 鋭い。/ Kanojo no dousatsuryoku wa surudoi. = Her powers of insight are keen.

Example 2: あなたは どうさつりょくを  もっと みがくべきだ。/ あなたは 洞察力を もっと みがくべきだ。/ Anata wa dousatsuryoku wo motto migakubeki da. = You ought to work on (“polish”) your powers of insight.

Photo: Keiji Koizumi

Word of the day: Hatsumoude (はつもうで – 初詣)

Hatsumoude (はつもうで – 初詣)
Meaning:  First visit of the year to a shrine or a Buddhist temple

Example 1: わたしは いちがつ みっかに はつもうでに いってきました。 /  私は 一月 三日に 初詣に 行って来ました。/ Watashi wa ichi-gatsu mikka ni hatsumoude ni itte kimashita. = I went to Hatsumoude on January 3rd.

Example 2: めいじ じんぐうは はつもうでの ひとたちで いっぱい でした。 /  明治神宮は 初詣の 人達で 一杯 でした。/ Meiji-jinguu wa hatsumoude no hitotachi de ippai deshita. = Meiji-jinguu was filled with people for Hatsumoude.

Cultural Note: First visit of the year to a shrine or a Buddhist temple in Japan. It is traditional to visit a shrine or a Buddhist temple for the New Year. Fortunes (o-mikuji) are drawn, prayers (o-inori) for the new year are given, and amulets (o-mamori) for protection and good luck are purchased.

Please click the play button to listen to the recording.
It’s very important to get used to hearing flowing speech at normal speeds. And even more important is to practice pronouncing things in the same way as native speakers. First, listen carefully, comparing to the script where you have trouble. Then try reading out loud along with the actor, and compare your pronunciation to hers.

Photo: Keiji Koizumi

ord of the Day: Hatsumoude (はつもうで – 初詣) Meaning:  First visit of the year to a shrine or a Buddhist temple
Example 1: わたしは いちがつ みっかに はつもうでに いってきました。 /  私は 一月 三日に 初詣に 行って来ました。/ Watashi wa ichi-gatsu mikka ni hatsumoude ni itte kimashita. = I went to Hatsumoude on January 3rd.
Example 2: めいじ じんぐうは はつもうでの ひとたちで いっぱい でした。 /  明治神宮は 初詣の 人達で 一杯 でした。/ Meiji-jinguu wa hatsumoude no hitotachi de ippai deshita. = Meiji-jinguu was filled with people for Hatsumoude.
Cultural Note:  In Japan, it is traditional to visit a shrine or a Buddhist temple for the New Year. Fortunes (o-mikuji) are drawn, prayers (o-inori) for the new year are given, and amulets (o-mamori) for protection and good luck are purchased.
https://soundcloud.com/human-japanese/word-of-the-day-hatsumoude

Oomisoka

Oomisoka (おおみそか- 大晦日) Meaning: New Year’s Eve

Example 1: きょうは おおみそかです。としこしそばを たべましょう。 / 今日は 大晦日です。年越し蕎麦を 食べましょう。/ Kyou wa oomisoka desu. Toshikoshi soba wo tabemashou. = Today is the New Year’s Eve. Let’s eat toshikoshi-soba.

Example 2: とうとう おおみそか ですね。らいねんも けんこうで しあわせな としに なりますように。 / とうとう 大晦日 ですね。来年も 健康で 幸せな 年に なりますように。/ Toutou oomisoka desu ne. Rainen mo kenkou de shiawase na toshi ni narimasu you ni. = It’s finally New Year’s Eve. Here’s to a healthy and happy year.

Cultural Note: Toshikoshi-soba is a traditional dinner for New Year’s Eve in Japan. It is symbolic of a person’s wish to have a long life like soba.